Friday, November 17, 2017

The "Good Kid": Compliant or Engaged?

It's interesting when I hear teachers describe a student as "a good kid". I was that good kid in school. And, unfortunately, I definitely described some of my former students that way earlier in my career.

But what do we mean when we say "good kid"?

A good kid completes school work without many complaints. A good kid never breaks school rules. A good kid studies hard and carries out assignments to the best of her/his ability. A good kid is quiet when appropriate and participates when appropriate in class.

So, when we say that a student is a "good kid" we are actually describing someone who is compliant. A teacher with compliant students is able to get through each school day rather smoothly. But, from the student perspective, is using the path of least resistance actually the best way to learn?


Instead, we should encourage our children to be engaged at school. The Glossary of Education Reform explains student engagement in this way:


Inquisitive, Interested, Inspired.

These three descriptors – inquisitive, interested, inspired – are the defining elements of student engagement. In order for student to be engaged, they must be curious about their topic and task (INQUISITIVE). They must be wondering what the answers are and where they can find them (INTERESTED). They must believe that finding those answers and sharing them with others will make an impact (INSPIRED).

A student who is quietly completing instructions provided by a teacher and contributing to a peaceful silent classroom might be engaged. But she also might be merely complying.

A student who participates in class activities and games, often filled with music and fast-paced rewards, might enjoy playing the game. But it is not guaranteed that he is invested and engaged in his learning.

A student who turns in a high quality final project might have been engaged throughout the process. But she might have been merely complying through each step.

How can we tell the difference?

Students who are compliant:

  • are quiet or are vocal and obedient.
  • never (ever) question the lesson or asks questions the teacher doesn't anticipate.
  • when faced with a mistake, the student worries about the impact on his/her grade.

Students who are engaged:

  • are eager. Sometimes this manifests as quiet and busy. Other times it manifests with vocal and even disruptive questions.
  • wonder out loud about the facts and ideas they are being asked to learn. They are inherently curious.
  • when faced with a mistake, the student redoubles effort toward the goal or adjusts – not dilutes – the goal accordingly.

How can we make the difference?

The answer is student choice and voice. These terms have become buzzwords and, for many, have lost their meaning. Still we should ask our learners questions like:

  • What do YOU want to research?
  • What do YOU need to be successful?
  • What story do YOU want to tell?
  • What do YOU want to make?
  • How do YOU want to show what you've learned?

When teachers ask their students these questions, students are often ready to share their ideas. Some students have been ready their whole lives and the ideas will explode. Others will be hesitant because they've become accustomed to a compliant school culture. These learners will want to know the formula or recipe for success. Resist. Respond to their questions with the questions above. Stir the curiosity and engagement inside of them.

As parents, teachers, coaches, and administrators we can rise to this occasion. We can show the learners we care for – whether they are our students or our own children – that we want them to be curious and engaged, not obedient and compliant. Engagement is the key to deep learning and active citizenship.

I don't want anyone to describe my daughters or my students as "compliant." What is easier is not always better. When it comes to the children I care for, whether they are family or students, I'd much prefer adjectives like "engaged" and "curious."

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Getting Real About the Teen Depression-Cyberbullying Connection

A couple of months ago I wrote a response to a psychologist's theory that smart phones are responsible for the increase in teen depression and anxiety. The overemphasis on screen technology as a root cause for the increase of major depressive episodes among teens and young adults is not new. The most popular articles about this topic found online, like this recent one from Time, will continue to confirm that screens are the problem because it is an easy answer and soothes adults who are not sure how to manage the tech use of the adolescents and teens in their lives. There is not doubt, the stories of individual teens they tell in those articles are touching and concerning.


According to the Mayo Clinic, the true causes of teen depression are:

  • biological chemistry
  • hormones
  • inherited traits
  • early childhood trauma
  • learned patterns of negative thinking

Surely some of the learned patterns of negative thinking can stem from some interactions students have online, especially cyberbullying. While cyberbullying is a phenomenon educators and parents need to help their children understand and overcome, its prevalence should not be overestimated. In fact, a recent survey shows that most bullying is verbal and the vast majority is in person.


This information is not meant to minimize the traumatic impact cyberbullying can have. (There is help available. My favorite resources are ConnectSafely's Parent's Guide to Cyberbullying and Parent, Educator & Youth Guide to LGBTQ Cyberbullying.) It is meant to provide a realistic understanding of the myriad of causes of teen depression and anxiety. Even if we were able to eradicate cyberbullying among children and adults, the major causes of teen depression would still exist. It's time to stop blaming devices and apps and start addressing the true root causes more holistically.


You can follow Jocelyn Brewer on Instagram at @diginutrition.


The well-being of the teens and adolescents in your life depends on your awareness of ALL potential causes of depression and anxiety. In addition to the Mayo Clinic webpage hyperlinked earlier, I also recommend the National Institute of Mental Health. Read them, build your awareness, and be careful to avoid simple explanations – like blaming cell phones and social media – for the rise in teen depression and anxiety. Raising and educating healthy children is challenging, complicated, and incredible rewarding.

Sunday, November 5, 2017

Are curriculum specialists in edtech denial?

As an educator who has built my career during the 21st Century, I've found that my fellow education professionals often classify themselves in one of two categories:
  1. Specialize in curriculum (often in one specific subject area)
  2. Specialize in technology (either as part of IT or integration)
This is a mistake.

Curriculum is the what, education technology (aka edtech) is the how. They have to be developed together in order for a student's learning experience to be engaging, effective, and relevant.


Edtech Defined

Recently I was asked to define edtech. Here is how I responded:
"Education technology – or edtech – is the study and practice of effective teaching and learning processes and strategies that incorporate devices, apps, programs, and media. Edtech can be used in traditional classrooms, at home, and as part of learning in almost any setting."

My definition encompasses more than devices and apps. Because we put the word "education" in front of "technology" we are giving the term greater meaning. Education is not made up of tools. Rather, education is made up of research-based, interpersonal, creative instructional practice and the teachers and students who participate in that practice. Teachers who seek to make their instructional practice a best practice in today's world seek to incorporate technology devices, programs, and resources.

While it is appropriate for an educator to specialize in a particular curriculum area – like early childhood, middle level humanities, studio art, or advanced chemistry – it is inappropriate for any of these specialists to brush off edtech as if it is not something needed in their classroom. Effective teaching practice incorporates the tools and skills that students are already using and will need to learn for the future. These include accessing, analyzing, and interpreting digital resources. They also include communicating, creating, and sharing using digital tools and programs.

This does not mean that students should not be writing with pencil and paper, reading physical books, creating with materials like scissors, wood, string, glue, and paint. But they should be using edtech seamlessly as they plan, design, organize, analyze, and share their learning with these items.

As with other education concepts – such as common assessments and standards-based grading –edtech can be practiced properly or it can be practice poorly. For instance, when fill-in-the-blank worksheets are distributed as digital PDFs instead of on paper, teachers should not be surprised if their students succumb to the temptation to navigate away from the PDF to other media on their device. Mere substitution of digital for paper is an example of poorly practiced edtech. Learning what constitutes effective edtech is essential.

Effective


  • Edtech is effective when it allows students to access information, collaborate with others, and create in ways that were previously impossible. 
  • Edtech is effective when it is use in concert with face-to-face social environments and non-digital resources. 


Not Effective


  • Edtech is not effective when it is used as a substitute for a great teacher who cares to get to know her students and build positive educational relationships with them. 
  • Edtech is not effective when a paper worksheet is merely traded for a PDF and and hardcover is merely traded for an ebook.

Often educators enter the classroom with a passion for their subject matter specialty and for working with children. The most effective educators constantly seek to learn more about their subject matter AND about how to best teach the children they serve. Edtech must be a part of that professional learning and a part of every classroom.

Saturday, November 4, 2017

Breaking my Blogging Dry Spell

The people I live and work closely with know that I've been neglecting this blog for nearly 2 months. But there's more to it than that. Because I haven't been writing, I haven't been processing my professional thoughts and experiences in the same way. For years this blog has been the place I go to sort out and express my professional thinking, and I'm back.


How it happened

Just after my last post, there was a sudden change that happened at my school. What the change was does not matter in this context, but it did turn my understanding of my place and my role there upside down for a while. It took a lot of mental energy for me to develop new understandings and I was honestly a bit unsure of myself during that time. I was afraid to share here.

A realization

Now I realize that I should have blogged about a lot of that. Like many education bloggers, the topics of my posts are often inspired by experiences that I have every day at school. I do not write specifically about students or teachers without their permission, but I do share my research and ideas based on my work with them. During the last 2 months, I've done a LOT of research and thinking. The act of writing pushes me to organize and interpret that research and thinking into strategies that I can use and share here.

By failing to go through the writing process during that transition, I was failing myself.

Forgiving myself

I was probably ready to start writing a couple of weeks ago, but restarting was harder than I expected: What should my re-entry post be about? Was anything I was currently working on or thinking about interesting enough to share with other educators? The first post of my return had to about something important in order to be worthy, right?

Now that I read those questions typed out plainly on my screen, I can't even believe I let myself think those things. Those are precisely the questions of self-doubt that I'm often telling my colleagues to avoid as they venture into blogging. Educators who are willing to take the time to write about their professional work and share it with others are committing an act of generosity, inspiration, and selflessness. Your colleagues around the country and around the world learn more from you than you realize.

I have 3 or 4 more blog posts outlined in the notes app on my iPhone. I pledge the write them over the next few weeks and share them here. No more self doubt. No more perceived writer's block.

When you go through a similar time in your professional life, I hope you can remember this post and forgive yourself sooner than I did. Educators everywhere need your ideas and work so that they can grow and become better. Don't hold back.