Friday, May 19, 2017

Vetting Student Apps Isn't Enough: Data Privacy for Teachers and Parents


If you're still skeptical that student data privacy issues are of the utmost importance in school communities, check out the latest information about the massive data breach from a prominent edtech company. Implementation of a vetting process for new apps or programs in school districts is essential to protect students' personally identifiable information (PII) and aggregated data. (If you're looking for information on setting up your own vetting policy, download this toolkit from CoSN and check out some resources from Cambridge Public Schools.) The alphabet soup of regulations – like FERPA and COPPA – can be dizzying, but they need attention. But once your vetting process is in place, it isn't time to relax just yet. Rather, schools and districts should push themselves even further.

As a teacher, I sometimes found it frustrating when I had to wait to get access to the digital tools I wanted my students to be able to use. (If I had decided that a video creation tool was great, I wanted my students to be able to try it out right away!) Now, as a digital learning specialist, I want to make sure the teachers I work with feel as little frustration as possible and develop an understanding of why short delays are sometimes inevitable. Based on my experiences as a classroom teacher and a digital instructional coach, I have some recommendations for the steps schools should take.

Above all, make sure your vetting and deployment process is thorough, but also quick and clear. Ideally, teachers should not have to wait more than a couple of days to find out whether a tool they have requested will be permitted in their classrooms. Even the best-laid lesson plans are constantly shifting. Teachers need their administrators and technology experts to remain cognizant of that reality. After developing your expedient vetting policy and process, here are the steps I recommend so that the entire school community is informed and on board:

Step 1: Informal Teacher Professional Learning

Start by informing classroom teachers about the vetting process within normal conversations in regular team or department meetings. Make sure it is clear that teachers are not responsible for vetting on their own, but that the information is being shared with them so they can be more informed educators and users of digital tools. To help calm any anxieties, emphasize that the research, investigation, and communication with companies will be handled by district technology and administrative professionals.

At this stage, I have found it is also helpful to highlight a few examples of what the vetting team will look for when they read privacy policies and terms of use for any new apps or programs.  (At my school this short list included ad tracking, SSOs with social media, and age restrictions among others.) At the end of these discussions, it might be helpful to send teachers off with a little more information to read and digest on their own. I recommend the Educator's Guide to Data Privacy from ConnectSafely and the Future of Privacy Forum.

Step 2: Formal Teacher Professional Learning

After allowing a few months – either a summer break or a quarter grading period – for the new policy to settle in and become part of the routine, it is time to share more sophisticated information about data privacy and digital citizenship with teachers. Here's why: It is no longer uncommon practice for educators to share information about their profession, school, or even students online. It may be shared in a professional blog post, as part of an education-focused Twitter chat, or just as a funny anecdote on their personal social media account. Teachers need to understand that their personal and professional online identities are not separate because of the way their data trail connects everything they do.

No teacher should be told not to use digital tools or social media. Their positive modeling for the students and parents in your community is invaluable. In addition to the Educator's Guide to Student Data Privacy mentioned above, resources like the Educator's Guide to Social Media, a free guide from Larry Magid and I, and BrandED, a new book from Eric Sheninger and Trish Rubin, are excellent resources to help you plan those formal professional learning sessions with your teachers. This video or this video from Common Sense Education might be a great way to kick off your session.

Step 3: Curriculum Integration for Students

Now that your teachers understand privacy implications (based on the vetting process for student apps shared in Step 1 and the implications for their personal and professional lives in Step 2) they are better prepared to inform their students. Here are my top privacy integration tips:

  1. Planned integration of data privacy concepts in regular lessons. For example, when introducing a new vetted tool for which students have to sign in, the teacher could take a few moments to skim through the Terms of Use with students so they know the highlights to look for before they check the box during the account creation process. 
  2. In the moment discussion. Teachers like to call these "teachable moments." For instance, if your school has a one-to-one program and fully manages student devices, students might question why they are not permitted to download certain games or apps. Teachers can seize on this question to invite discussion about whether students think about what developers do with the information we share when we download and start using new un-vetted programs. (Hint: Unless the privacy policy says they do not share or sell that information with advertisers and companies looking to target new customers, it is likely that they do.)

Of course, this should be part of a thorough digital citizenship school-wide program. Data privacy is an essential part of helping our learners understand how their behavior online can have an impact on their in-person lives.

Step 4: Informal and Formal Parent Education

As part of that digital citizenship school-wide program, parent programming should be prioritized. At my school we provide webinars that are both live and recorded, parent council presentations, and interactive experiences specifically for grandparents, incoming parents, and more. While some offerings are compulsory and others are optional, there is no way to offer too much parent education around digital health and safety in schools and at home. In my experience, parents are hungry for help when it comes to managing their children's screen time, online interactions, and developing a healthy balance of technology use. In fact, we are constantly looking for new ways to reach more parents and are hoping to offer even more programming next year.

Some of my favorite resources for parents include ConnectSafely's library of Parent Guides and Janell Burley Hoffman's iRules.

Now, in you district, the order of these steps might be different based on the interests and involvement of your stakeholders. This post is not meant to be a decisive solution. It presents options and ideas to provide guidance for schools that are in the midst of the process.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Three Little Words

There are these 3 particular words/phrases that are used often in my professional circles. As their use increases, so do the number of eye-rolls I've observed in reaction to their use.

Disclaimer: I've noticed myself both using them and eye-rolling in reaction to them.

In my recent column for EdSurge, I documented the education jargon that stops short of inspiring the educators in my PLN based on their responses to my Facebook post. By the end of the post, I suggested that we educators should think about the real intentions and actions of the person using the words instead of our own prejudices against them.

It is time to challenge myself and my own thinking. So, I'm going to go through that same process. What are the education words/phrases that have lost meaning for me? How can I look past my own jaded thinking and open my mind to ideas, even when the person proposing the new ideas uses those words?

Word #1: Innovate

When I hear speakers say or read blog posts demanding that teachers need to be more innovative, I'm sometimes less than inspired. While I was eager to try new approaches in my own classroom as a teacher and am eager to try new approaches to professional learning in my current role, I also know that it is frustrating to hear that my best might not be innovative enough. But instead of internalizing that word in a negative way, it is important for me to step away and think about the intention of the person using it.

I looked up the meaning of the word itself:

If the blogger or speaker uses innovate/innovation to describe new methods for solving ongoing problems and has ideas for how to investigate or implement those new ideas, why not listen with an open mind? In schools this could mean getting creative with the scheduling of the school day, using classrooms and other spaces in non-traditional ways, or even looking at high school curriculum with a thematic cross-curricular perspective rather than in isolated subject areas. There are countless other examples of education innovations that would shake up the way things are done, might create a little extra work and discomfort, but are also worth trying for the sake of solving ongoing problems.

Word #2: Amplify

In the music world, amplify means to increase the volume of a sound. In education, it isn't enough to think of amplify as a synonym for increase. For instance, it is doubtful that most teachers would advocate for amplifying/increasing the number of tests students have to take or the hours of homework they have to complete. In the definition of amplify, it is the third option that captures my attention most:

Something that is "more marked" is noticeable or hard to ignore. Of course we want our students' work to be noticed by their peers and even the community beyond our classrooms. When we ensure that our learners know why they are working toward a learning goal – sometimes referred to as the "so what?" of a lesson – the end result of that learning should be original creations that those students are proud to share. Those products should be "more marked" and harder to ignore than their previous work.

Something that is "intense" helps people feel emotions or sensations that they might not otherwise feel. If student learning is intense then they are experiencing that learning in a deeper way that taps into emotions and physical sensations. Our young learners are more likely to internalize a new skill or idea if the have experienced it, rather than merely memorizing it.

When we think about amplifying learning in terms of making it "more marked" or "intense" it is hard to debate the power behind the sentiment. (By the way, if you are looking for concrete ideas for how to amplify learning in your classroom, check out Amplify by Kristin Ziemke and Katie Muhtaris. It's a book. You should read it.)

Word (OK, Phrase) #3: Take it to the next level

When I hear this phrase tossed around in keynote addresses or in the titles of high-profile blog posts, I can't help but think – at least for a moment – like a jaded long-time teacher who has been forced to structure curriculum via predetermined levels, to choose levels for my students as they move on to the next school year, and to look at test scores as determining factors for student leveling.  As I'm sure you are already imagining – or as you have experienced yourself – these are not empowering or inspiring moments in one's teaching career.

But let's look at this phrase, and the word level, from a completely different perspective. Let's start with the definition:

What did you notice first? For me, it was the part that stated it referred to "something that is already successful." Well. Dude. That changes literally everything about my preconceived notions of the phrase.

We are no longer talking about forcing unique, talented, imperfect, genuine students into a leveling system that doesn't take their personalized needs into account. Instead we are talking about looking at a practice, lesson, or project that is already working and making it work even better for our students. So, did you try adding something new to your Civil War unit? It went OK! But now you're even more excited to change a few other parts of the unit next year. You are reflecting, researching, and planning. You are taking it to the next level. And there is nothing bad about that approach in education.

______________________

No more eye rolls. I promise. I might even use these terms in a PD session, conference presentation, or upcoming blog post. There are plenty of other little words that have gradually lost their charm in the education world. Rather than take a critical stance, perhaps we can take a deep breath and think back to why the words had power in the first place.

Harness that power.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

It's Here! And This is the Story Behind It.

As is typical on a weeknight, I'd just tucked my children into bed and was on my laptop plugging away on a project for school when my email inbox pinged. I skimmed the incoming message from my ConnectSafely colleague and CEO Larry Magid. In the email, he asked me to co-author a new guidebook on how to address fake news. Without hesitation, I replied, "YES!"

Here's why:

Biased and false reports are not new in this booming era of information technology, but the 2016 election definitely created urgency around the issue for more Americans. This urgency is especially great for educators and parents. Throughout the election cycle, my colleagues and I worked hard to respond to the questions of our adolescent and teen students with the right balance of compassion and impartiality. At home, my husband and I struggled to answer our young children's questions as they heard unfamiliar and confusing statements about what the future might hold.

Rather than blaming politicians or media outlets – which does not seem to change what we see or read online – the best approach is to get to the root of the problem: There needs to be a greater focus on teaching our children and teens to be critical, but not jaded, consumers of and contributors to the online world.

In short, we need to redouble our efforts toward improving media literacy.

So, when my ConnectSafely colleague Larry Magid asked me to co-author a guide on this very topic a few months ago, I jumped at the opportunity. Not only am I passionate about it because of my own experiences at home and at school, Larry's career as a journalist and my career as a teacher created what I felt was a "dream team" to tackle it. After months of independent research, expert interviews, a writing retreat on the west coast, editing from our respective homes in weeks that followed, and peer review, the result is the Parent and Educator Guide to Media Literacy and Fake News.


We are proud that this guide: 
  1. is free thanks to crowdfunding from our supporters,
  2. contains vignettes from renowned media literacy and emotional intelligence experts, and 
  3. is chock full of practical tips that parents can use tonight during dinner table discussions and educators can use today in their classrooms.
Those practical tips can help adults empower the young people in our lives to:
  • distinguish fact from opinion
  • identify mistakes versus lies
  • interpret conflicting reports
  • develop emotional intelligence
  • act with confidence when faced with falsehoods online

Please check out the guide, share it with your friends and colleagues, test the strategies, and let us know if you'd like to speak with us about the ideas it contains. We are happy to help and eager to hear from you.

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Four Great Google Forms Ideas to Try Right Away

There are certain tools that are so flexible and easy to use that their potential use cases are infinite. Google Forms has recently added some new features that make it one of the go-to tools I recommend to even the most tech-tentative educators. Previously, educators needed to use add-ons to make their Forms self-correcting, and the question-types and design options left much to be desired. But the new Forms have been leveraged by the teachers I work with in such creative and productive ways this school year. They are worth recording in this post so that more students and educators can benefit.


Use #1: Flipped Activity Instructions

The Pain Point
Our middle school physical education teachers sometimes use videos from Ninh Ly's Rules of Sports YouTube playlist to teach their students the rules of a sport before they head outside to play it. The downside is that playing the videos during class time takes away from precious active time on the field or court. With class periods that are only 45 minutes long, they need to make every minute count.

Google Forms to the Rescue
One of the teachers now makes quick 5-8 question Forms and then posts both the link to the video and the link to the Form on his class website. Students take about 5-10 minutes to watch the videos and complete the Forms at home. Before they even see their students the next day, teachers know which students have watched the videos, whether they understand the rules, and which elements might need a quick review. Even better, students instantly know how they've done on the Form because the teachers use the Quizzes feature (accessible by clicking the the gear on the upper right when building a Form) to ensure that the Form tells students their results right away so they know what to expect the next day in class. Now everyone has much more time for active play during the school day.

Use #2: Midyear Student Feedback

The Pain Point
The teachers in one of our academic departments are striving to deliver a more consistent experience across their classes so that more of our students master their content at the appropriate level before moving up in subsequent school years. Although tests and quizzes can check for academic mastery, they do not help measure whether teachers are using consistent methods or workload and how well students are handling the curriculum and assignments.

Google Forms to the Rescue
One way to measure consistency is through student feedback on homework, teacher helpfulness, assessment fairness, and more. After a brief training on Forms, a group of 5 teachers developed a 30 question Form that all of their students took to provide them with important feedback. Questions asked which resources and tools are most helpful, how students manage homework, whether curriculum pacing was reasonable, and if grading policies were clear. They used the results to create an action plan for the second half of the school year and are planning to survey the students again to see if the adjustments they made are helping their students.

Use #3: Student Research as Part of PBL

The Pain Point
One of our English teachers wanted to bring the reading gender gap to her students' attention. They read Why boys don't read and then were charged with finding out whether the information in the article was an accurate reflection of themselves. (We work at an all-boys school.) Of course, they were also charged with developing their own actionable solutions that could help encourage them and their peers to read more.

Google Forms to the Rescue
In order to determine whether their own reading habits fit within the concerns expressed in the article, they worked together to develop a Form. They decided to ask about how they find books to read, how often they read for pleasure, and whether they identify themselves as "readers." The results indicated that they did, in fact, represent the boys the article was about. It allowed them to become more invested in their projects over the long haul. Today many of those students are living out their projects by working with school librarians and administrators to create new initiatives that will increase reading for pleasure among our student population.

Use #4: Classroom Questions with Live Results

The Pain Point
This idea actually came from a recent conference presentation. At ASCD's Empower conference, I co-presented a session on promoting young education leaders. My co-presenters and I knew that our audience would include both administrators looking to promote leadership and young educators looking to become leaders, but knowing the makeup of our audience would help us tailor the session to their goals. Similarly, teachers often launch into a lesson without knowing for sure whether the classroom full of students has existing opinions/perspectives on the topic.

Google Forms to the Rescue
We created a one question Form for participants to answer, identifying their role at their school or district. Then, while they answered, we projected the responses tab of the Form on the big screen. The pie chart that Forms auto-generates for multiple choice questions live updated the results. We all watched together as we discovered that the room was fill with 56 participants from varying roles. This same tactic could be quickly and easily applied to the start of any new lesson or project in any classroom.

How are you stretching and using Forms with your students and colleagues? The possibilities are literally endless. Share your favorite tips and links to your own blog posts below!

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

The Digital Day in the Life of a Teacher


As we near the end of the school year, teachers are working harder than ever to keep their students engaged and to maximize every single day they have left with them in the classroom. Teachers are the superheroes of education and there is nothing more important in a teacher’s day than the face-to-face connections they make with their students. According to renowned education researchers Robert and Jana Marzano, “Teacher-student relationships provide an essential foundation for effective classroom management—and classroom management is a key to high student achievement.” To ensure that limited face to face time in the classroom can be as meaningful is possible, teachers are using digital tools to bring learning and sharing beyond the classroom. And, when everything teachers do every day is listed, it is truly amazing to imagine how they juggle it all. So, what does a typical digital day look like for a teacher who is doing this well?



Before the School Day Begins

  • Check and respond to messages from students, parents, and colleagues. Share any learning data about students with parents who have requested it and answer any student questions that were sent last night.
  • Be sure that all resources and activities are curated and posted online so students can access them as needed during the school day.
  • If students had homework, review the online results of student assignments completed last night. Were students messaging back and forth about anything in particular? Do their scores/results indicate that there are aspects of the content many of them are struggling with? These topics might deserve a second look during class today.


During Class Times

  • Greet students at the door and have bell-ringer/activator instructions projected in the classroom. Be sure the digital tools and resources students need are easy to access and are free from pop-ups or other distractions so learners are ready to engage appropriately with technology as soon as they enter the classroom.
  • During class discussions and small group activities, provide students with an online message board where they can post their questions or ideas. While extroverts have no problem speaking up out loud, introverts will appreciate the opportunity to share their ideas this way.
  • Spend some of class time chatting one-on-one with students who need interventions that day. This can be necessary due to academic or social-emotional needs. Be sure the rest of the students are engaged in meaningful learning endeavors throughout these chats.
  • Close class time by reviewing the questions and ideas posted on the digital message board and pointing out where students can find their homework, if they have any, that night.


During the Prep Period

  • Check in with colleagues both in person and online to share resources and ask for feedback on upcoming lessons and projects.
  • Use social media to connect with the professional learning network. This allows teachers to create collegial relationships and get additional feedback from professionals beyond their school or state.
  • Examine student work and learning data created during class time and use it to refine lesson plans for tomorrow and the rest of the week.
  • Conduct research to find high quality OERs like online readings, videos, simulations, and activities. Curate those online resources so they are easy to find and share later with students, colleagues, and parents.


When the School Day is Over

  • Meet with students and parents who have requested conferences to help them reach their academic and social-emotional goals. Share any resources and data that can help everyone craft a plan in the best interest of the student. Providing online secure access to this information is usually most efficient.
  • If it isn’t a student or parent conference day, teachers likely have department, faculty, or committee meetings to attend and participate in. This means reviewing resources and preparing and sharing a working agenda for the meeting so that precious time can be productive.
  • Most teachers also advise clubs or coach teams. It is important to communicate with students involved in those extracurriculars via some digital means to keep everyone informed about scheduling meeting/practice/competition times.
  • Later in the evenings, teachers often finish up reviewing student data, fine tuning lesson plans, and answering any student or parent messages that have come through during the afternoon and evening hours.


Some teachers are seemingly superheroes and are able to juggle all of these tasks daily so those precious face-to-face minutes are as impactful as possible, but many struggle because finding the right combination of online communication tools, activities, and resources is a challenge. Schools must be sure to provide the right learning management system, such as itslearning, so that everything teachers, students, and parents need is available through one intuitive platform. Then every teacher can feel like a superhero of the classroom. All of this digital communication, preparation, and engagement makes it possible for precious in-class and extracurricular face-to-face time to be dedicated to building those relationships that are the “essential foundation” for classroom management and student achievement.


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Note: This is a sponsored post. While there was compensation for this post, no product will ever be highlighted on this blog unless the author believes in its value to educators.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Getting Over the Innovation Hump


Many schools are now 5 or more years into their BYOD or 1-to-1 programs and progress has stalled a bit. Early adopters, both students and teachers, continue innovate as they explore increasingly creative uses of the device. The majority have come on board and are relying on a smaller set of device functions, and are willing to continue learning and improving use. A smaller set are still critical of the program and are not integrating beneficial functions of the device in their classrooms. According to the Diffusion of Innovation Theory, which I've referenced before, this is normal. But it can still be concerning if the gap between the early adopters and the critics continues to grow and student experiences are vastly different from classroom to classroom.

It is healthy for any social system, such as a school community, to have critics who question and push everyone to clarify their thinking and improve their practices. But critics that refuse to budge can have a negative impact on both school culture and student learning. It can lead to a situation of "haves" and "have nots" in which a student's category depends solely on the teacher she has.

Once all concerns have been addressed, if there are still a few holdouts who are not utilizing the device at all there is a need for further action. Here are my recommendations:

Institution-Wide Norms

Start by setting up both acceptable and encouraged use guidelines for existing devices and new tools as they are rolled out. Every stakeholder  – teachers, students, parents, coaches, counselors, and administrators – should help create the norms and should clearly understand how the device can help the school reach toward its goals of educating and empowering every child. Guidelines that both establish boundaries and open doors are crucial. For instance, it is important for everyone in the community to be aware of the boundaries for safe social media use but also to know that social media can help forge connections with outside experts and resources to enhance the educational experience. School guidelines that clarify these norms are essential because they provide a solid foundation on which to build success.

Ongoing Proactive Conversations

If the school is constantly reacting to concerns or responding to crises, innovation can stall. Even when things are going well, educators should take part in consistent structured conversations to celebrate success and strategize about continued improvement. Here are some topic recommendations:

  • Hacks, Tips, and Tricks: In a recent informal panel at school, a middle school science teacher shared that he color codes the backgrounds of his digital handouts. A quick visual scan around the room and he instantly knows who is looking at the document with the green background and who might be off task. A room full of educators gasped at the genius but simple tip.
  • Best Practices: A few months ago an entire department met to talk about digital note-taking versus pencil-and-paper note-taking. Based on research and professional experience, the group of teachers agreed on best practices for when handwriting would enhance learning and when digital notes would best serve student needs. 

Circle Back

All guidelines, hacks, and best practices need regular revision. Incorporate reflection and revision activities into professional learning time. The educators in the room when that middle school teacher shared his color-coding hack are already scheduled to meet again in a month to share whether they've tried it and how successful it's been. Similarly, that department met again about a month after their note-taking conversation. The problem wasn't completely solved, but everyone in the group had taken at least a few small steps forward and was ready to have another solution-focused meeting of the minds.

All stakeholders, from the early adopters to the critics, should regularly engage in structured forward-looking conversations. Only then will the entire institution continue to meet the needs of an ever-changing student population who arrive at school with ever-more-complex devices in their hands. There is no quick fix or secret key to sustainable progress. These three recommendations should be implemented in concert and will result in a cultural shift. It will take longer than a month or a semester. If a negative dialogue is deeply ingrained in the school, it might even take longer than a single school year. The investment will be worth the effort to develop a positive school-wide culture and movement toward what is best for students.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Are You a Young Educator With Leadership Aspirations? 4 Tips You Need to Know

Education is constantly evolving, and intelligent innovative educators are ready to evolve with it. Sometimes the professionals who are ready to step into leadership positions are on the younger side. Pulling together the right support system and mindset is essential to the success of educators with these aspirations.

I had the opportunity to learn and present with some of the top young education leaders this weekend at ASCD's Empower conference in Anaheim, California. In a carousel-style workshop, we shared with (and learned from) fellow leaders to develop our skills and bring a refreshed mindset back to our schools and districts.

Here are our top 4 takeaways:

Saying "Yes" and Taking Chances

Amy MacCrindle, Director of Literacy from Illinois, reminds young leaders that sometimes all it takes is 3 little letters to take the leap into leadership. Her experiences can be narrowed to 3 pieces of advice:

  • Amy says, "opportunities that fall outside your comfort zone end up being the ones that stretch you and become defining moments." 
  • But be sure to only say yes when your heart is in it. If an opportunity does not align with your vision and goals, it could end up being a tough experience. 
  • Saying no usually means that same opportunity will never come along again, so always consider saying yes. But if you end up saying no, a new similar/better opportunity will likely come along soon! Sometimes it is OK to say no because you know you will be ready to say yes later.


Leveraging Networks

Natalie Franzi, Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Projects in New Jersey, highlighted the importance of finding organizations that can help support leadership goals and encourage growth. Her tips for finding your tribe are:

  • Find the people who will lift you up. Leaders need to find sources of learning and encouragement to stay fueled during the day-in and day-out of their duties.
  • Make the time. Natalie says, "While many of us already feel overwhelmed and wonder where we are going to get the time to add one more thing, investing in a network will save time in the long run." She suggests that networks provide access to resources and opportunities to present, blog, and collaborate.
  • Explore the options. She put together this hyperdoc with information about her favorite professional educator organizations and links to their websites. Explore it to find the networks that best fit your leadership aspirations.


Becoming a Reflective Leader

Adam Brown, Principal from Virginia, encouraged participants to build reflection into daily practice. Gaining a leadership title is a chance to grow and learn in new ways, not a signal to stop growing and learning. His suggestions included:

  • Lead with humility. Adam says, "Be OK with not knowing everything. Find a mentor who is going to be honest with you and won't be afraid to tell it like it is." Insecure leaders are afraid to admit their faults, but people have greater respect for leaders who are willing to say they do not know everything.
  • Read and challenge yourself to improve your leadership style. Adams top reads include Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Leadership and the New Science, In Search of Excellence, Shifting the Monkey, and Good to Great. While balancing work and family, Adam uses his commuting time to listen to audio books.
  • Balance active listening, effective communication, and transparency. Adam cites the Adaptive Schools program as his biggest influence in this area.


Strategies and Tools for Personalized Professional Learning

My contribution included sharing the tactics and technology that have allowed me to grow as a connected educator when I needed the growth. While many schools and districts offer impressive PD opportunities, personalized on-demand feedback is especially powerful because you are able to get it when you need it. I recommended:

  • Write about your experiences and then share them on a blog. The feedback you'll get will be just as valuable as the act of writing in the first place.
  • Use tools like Facebook Groups, Voxer Chats, and Google Hangouts to connect with other leaders from throughout the country. Often conversations start on Twitter, but another platform is needed to delve more deeply into the topic.
  • Make connections in person at conferences. Then trade usernames/handles to help build those connections into a Personal Learning Network (PLN) using social media and communication tools.


With the right mindset, support network, reflective practices, and combination of strategic tools, young ambitious educators can be well-prepared for the challenges that will face them. While leadership is filled with challenges, it is also filled with opportunities for creating real change that can benefit students and teachers.